Liberty university rgln 104 quiz 1

 

Liberty University RGLN 104 Quiz 1

RLGN 104 Quiz #1

·         Question 1

3.5 out of 3.5 points

This course (Apologetics 104) will be approaching the issue of “worldview” ….

·         Question 2

3.5 out of 3.5 points

When Jesus presented the gospel most people accepted it the first time they heard it.

·         Question 3

3.5 out of 3.5 points

Christian faith is simply a personal preference, a function of how one was raised, and a worldview that is only supported by emotional considerations.

·         Question 4

3.5 out of 3.5 points

When presenting the gospel to people Christians should be:

·         Question 5

3.5 out of 3.5 points

Apologetics for some is not discovered or understood until after they make a profession of faith. However, apologetics is important for all Christians to engage the culture.

·         Question 6

0 out of 3.5 points

A translation of the Bible is most accurate when translated by one, highly educated, highly qualified individual.

·         Question 7

3.5 out of 3.5 points

Hermeneutics is the method of interpreting the Bible.

·         Question 8

3.5 out of 3.5 points

When Jesus spoke as “one who had authority”:

·         Question 9

3.5 out of 3.5 points

The church fathers showed that they understood the importance of Jesus’ historicity when they crafted the _______________ Creed

·         Question 10

3.5 out of 3.5 points

According to Powell, the majority of Christian apologetics takes place in academic classrooms.

·         Question 11

3.5 out of 3.5 points

Because of the respect that people had for the Apostle Paul his message of Jesus Christ was accepted by almost everyone who heard him.

·         Question 12

3.5 out of 3.5 points

In describing “truth”, Powell states:

·         Question 13

3.5 out of 3.5 points

Preaching “the Word” only refers to the Old Testament since the writing of II Timothy 4:2 was before the New Testament was completed.

·         Question 14

3.5 out of 3.5 points

A Biblical Worldview is a perspective or viewpoint based upon the teachings of the Bible.

·         Question 15

3.5 out of 3.5 points

According to Powell, “reason” is not the enemy of “faith”.

·         Question 16

3.5 out of 3.5 points

Upon returning to the Decapolis region a second time after healing the crazed man who had been cutting himself with rocks, Jesus:

·         Question 17

3.5 out of 3.5 points

One of the first tasks of Christian apologetics is to provide information.

·         Question 18

3.5 out of 3.5 points

According to Powell, Christianity can be understood as an “antidote” rather than a lifestyle choice or part of a well-balanced religious view.

·         Question 19

3.5 out of 3.5 points

When Jesus healed the crazed man who lived in a graveyard near Decapolis the people of the city:

·         Question 20

3.5 out of 3.5 points

According to Dr. Weider the Christian faith is both reasonable and defendable.

Panda challenge 1 | Computer Science homework help

After a lot of hard work in the data munging mines, you’ve landed a job as Lead Analyst for an independent gaming company. You’ve been assigned the task of analyzing the data for their most recent fantasy game Heroes of Pymoli.

Like many others in its genre, the game is free-to-play, but players are encouraged to purchase optional items that enhance their playing experience. As a first task, the company would like you to generate a report that breaks down the game’s purchasing data into meaningful insights.

Your final report should include each of the following:

Player Count

Purchasing Analysis (Total)

  • Number of Unique Items
  • Average Purchase Price
  • Total Number of Purchases
  • Total Revenue

Gender Demographics

  • Percentage and Count of Male Players
  • Percentage and Count of Female Players
  • Percentage and Count of Other / Non-Disclosed

Purchasing Analysis (Gender)

  • The below each broken by gender
    • Purchase Count
    • Average Purchase Price
    • Total Purchase Value
    • Average Purchase Total per Person by Gender

Age Demographics

  • The below each broken into bins of 4 years (i.e. <10, 10-14, 15-19, etc.)
    • Purchase Count
    • Average Purchase Price
    • Total Purchase Value
    • Average Purchase Total per Person by Age Group

Top Spenders

  • Identify the the top 5 spenders in the game by total purchase value, then list (in a table):
    • SN
    • Purchase Count
    • Average Purchase Price
    • Total Purchase Value

Most Popular Items

  • Identify the 5 most popular items by purchase count, then list (in a table):
    • Item ID
    • Item Name
    • Purchase Count
    • Item Price
    • Total Purchase Value

Most Profitable Items

  • Identify the 5 most profitable items by total purchase value, then list (in a table):
    • Item ID
    • Item Name
    • Purchase Count
    • Item Price
    • Total Purchase Value

As final considerations:

  • You must use the Pandas Library and the Jupyter Notebook.
  • You must submit a link to your Jupyter Notebook with the viewable Data Frames.
  • You must include a written description of three observable trends based on the data.
  • See Example Solution for a reference on expected format(attachment).

Fintech | Financial markets homework help

Pick a Fintech company that interests you and figure out how it is improving the financial services landscape.

Each student must choose a unique company to research. Before starting, you will need to let me know your desired company and I will check to make sure there are no duplicates. 

All papers will be compiled into a directory and distributed to the students for future reference.

An excellent paper will include the following 5 components:

1. Brevity and clarity: 4-7 pages in length (including visuals).

2. Competitive analysis: Research 3 companies going after the same market or having the same product.

3. Structural advantage: An understanding of the company’s organizational / technological structure.

4. Critiques and insights: Your informed opinions resulting from your findings about the company. 

5. Employee insight: Video or voice-recording evidence of a personal interview with an employee, significant investor or outsourced vendor of that company. You should prepare a list of 10 questions in advance and figure out a way to arrange a brief 10 – 15 minute interview with someone from that company. A link to the video or voice recording should be uploaded in the comments section. Make sure to elaborate on the findings from your interview in the paper. The 10 questions for the employee should be included as an addendum at the end of your paper. If unable to speak to an employee and do an interview, you can instead look up an interview of an employee (in print or video) from that company and provide an overview of what was discussed, and answered. Please cite the reference and include the write up in the body of your paper.

Week 4 health care policy

Select the state where you plan to practice as a nurse practitioner and/or nurse leader and investigate the state’s policies on access to maternal health resources such as contraceptive care including abortion for women with and without health insurance coverage. Identify what are the state’s infant and maternal mortality rates and discuss the possible relationship between these factors.

I’m asking for 250 words in APA 6th ed. Plagiarism free. 2 scholarly sources within the past 6 years. Please provide plagiarism report. Due date: 5/26 @ 7pm 

Nur-621 economic theories and models in health care

the purpose of this assignment is to describe economic theories and models in health care. include your responses in the worksheet listed below and base your responses on evidence. include references to your textbook and one scholarly article. the four theories/models are listed below.

Assessment 1 instructions: capstone project summary

Review Attachments

Create a 2-3 page project summary that describes your chosen organization, a business problem or opportunity, the kind of data you will need, and how your topic allows you to demonstrate the MBA program outcomes.

Introduction

This course revolves around the creation of a single, significant capstone project. In other words, a project that caps off your learning and your program, allowing you to demonstrate the competencies of leadership and collaboration, ethical and evidence-based decision making, and innovative and strategic thinking. For your capstone, you will choose a real company and analyze it in a way that demonstrates your understanding of the MBA program outcomes. You will turn your analysis of that company into a written report with recommendations and a formal presentation for your intended audience.

Having a solid, doable scope is an important part of creating a successful capstone project, and the exact scope is up to you. To help you establish a realistic scope, you will start with the project summary. Be careful to consider the scalability of your project scope, ensuring that it demonstrates your ability to lead in a business environment and showcases your achievement of all MBA program outcomes.

Examples

A scope that is poorly defined:

  • I want to write a general analysis of the bookseller, Barnes & Noble.
    • This topic is too broad, and it would probably require hundreds of pages to address all of the possible analyses.

A scope that is better defined:

  • I want to focus on how Barnes & Noble has managed to survive the Internet age while Borders has crumbled.
    • What makes this a better scope? The scope is grounded in a problem (such as how to survive Internet competition) or opportunity (such as the area lacking a business that you plan to open), which allows you to focus the analysis.
    • It must also allow for you to analyze and suggest evidence-based recommendations, takeaways, or actionable next steps as the crux of your project.

Preparation

Assessment Description

For this assessment, introduce the organization you have chosen to research, why you chose it, and how it will allow you to demonstrate all of the MBA program outcomes.

Write a 2–3 page paper, in an academic writing style, that details the topic and scope of your capstone project. Your project summary should be clear and concise yet thorough enough for faculty to provide feedback and guidance. Your project summary should be well organized and include the following sections:

  • Describe the background of your chosen organization. 
    • Provide a brief background of your selected organization. For instance, discuss its product lines, number of years in business, organization structure, location, et cetera.
    • If you choose an organization for which you work, your introduction must include a statement that you received permission to use the company from a supervisor.
  • Describe a business topic, problem, or opportunity that you intend to research.
    • Describe the problem or opportunity you see that makes this company a good choice. 
    • Explain the scope of your project by clearly identifying the topics or areas you intend to research. 
  • Explain the level of accessibility to data necessary to examine the chosen business topic, problem, or opportunity.
    • Address how you will go about obtaining the data.
    • Identify any special requirements that you might need to meet to access the data you will need. 
    • Explain risks you think will be encountered and the mitigation plan to manage those risks.
  • Explain how your topic will allow you to showcase your leadership ability by demonstrating each MBA program outcome. 
    • List out each program outcome clearly, and then explain in 3–4 sentences how your topic will allow you to demonstrate each. The MBA program outcomes are listed in the MBA Capstone Project Description.
    • Identify specific items of your project summary that you believe demonstrates the outcome. 
  • Wrap up your paper with a clear, concise conclusion that summarizes your plan. Just a couple sentences is fine.

Your project summary should have these sections:

  • Introduction.
  • Statement of scope.
  • Demonstration of outcomes.
  • Conclusion. 

Review Attachments

Theme | English homework help

 

Theme Analysis

Think about all of the stories we’ve read for this class so far. 

  • “A&P”
  • “The Yellow Wallpaper”
  • “Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?”
  • “The Lottery”
  • “The Story of an Hour”
  • “Sonny’s Blues”
  • “Miss Brill”
  • “A Good Man is Hard to Find”
  • “The Storm”
  • “This is What it Means to Say Phoenix, Arizona”
  • “Everyday Use”
  • “The Things They Carried”
  • “The Lottery”
  • “A Worn Path”

For this journal entry, write about two of these stories that either (a) share a theme, which means that both stories essentially make the same point in their own ways or (b) share a topic, but have differing themes, which means they make different points about the same topic. For example, if there are two stories about growing up that seem to make the same point, that would be option (a); if there were two stories that each made a different point about growing up, that would be option (b). 

In your journal entry, write about the two stories and their themes. How are they expressed in the story? What other literary elements contribute to the theme (symbol, setting, etc)? What quotes show or emphasize the theme? Is the theme the same as the lesson learned by the main character?

Your journal entry should be about 300 words long, written in an academic style. There’s no formatting requirements for journal entries, but be sure you include the names of the stories and authors. If you use quotes from the stories, be sure to include page numbers. Do not consult or use outside sources for this assignment. This is a journal entry, so no introduction or conclusion is required. Just be sure you follow the assignment, answer the questions, proofread carefully, use complete sentences, and include details to support your points. 

Questions for book homeless | Article writing homework help

Anna Quindlen was born in 1953 and graduated from Barnard College in 1974. She worked as a reporter for the New York Post and the New York Times before taking over the latter’s “About New York” column, eventually serving as the paper’s deputy metropolitan editor and creating her own weekly column. Quindlen later wrote a twice-weekly op-ed column for the Times on social and political issues, earning a Pulitzer Prize for commentary in 1992. She also wrote a biweekly column for Newsweek magazine. Quindlen’s essays and columns are collected in Living Out Loud (1988), Thinking Out Loud (1993), and Loud and Clear (2004). Her memoir, Lots of Candles, Plenty of Cake, appeared in 2012. Quindlen has also published two books for children, four books of nonfiction with a how-to bent, and nine successful novels, most recently Alternate Side (2018). She lives in New York City.

Homeless

In this essay from Living Out Loud, Quindlen mingles a reporter’s respect for details with a keen sense of empathy, using examples to explore a persistent social issue. When Quindlen wrote, in 1987, homelessness had only recently become a severe and highly visible problem in New York City and elsewhere in the United States. The problem has not abated since then: Using government data, the National Alliance to End Homelessness estimates that more than half a million Americans are homeless on any given day.

Her name was Ann, and we met in the Port Authority Bus Terminal several Januarys ago. I was doing a story on homeless people. She said I was wasting my time talking to her; she was just passing through, although she’d been passing through for more than two weeks. To prove to me that this was true, she rummaged through a tote bag and a manila envelope and finally unfolded a sheet of typing paper and brought out her photographs.

They were not pictures of family, or friends, or even a dog or cat, its eyes brown-red in the flashbulb’s light. They were pictures of a house. It was like a thousand houses in a hundred towns, not suburb, not city, but somewhere in between, with aluminum siding and a chain-link fence, a narrow driveway running up to a one-car garage and a patch of backyard. The house was yellow. I looked on the back for a date or a name, but neither was there. There was no need for discussion. I knew what she was trying to tell me, for it was something I had often felt. She was not adrift, alone, anonymous, although her bags and her raincoat with the grime shadowing its creases had made me believe she was. She had a house, or at least once upon a time had had one. Inside were curtains, a couch, a stove, potholders. You are where you live. She was somebody.

I’ve never been very good at looking at the big picture, taking the global view, and I’ve always been a person with an overactive sense of place, the legacy of an Irish grandfather. So it is natural that the thing that seems most wrong with the world to me right now is that there are so many people with no homes. I’m not simply talking about shelter from the elements, or three square meals a day or a mailing address to which the welfare people can send the check — although I know that all these are important for survival. I’m talking about a home, about precisely those kinds of feelings that have wound up in cross-stitch and French knots on samplers over the years.

Home is where the heart is. There’s no place like it. I love my home with a ferocity totally out of proportion to its appearance or location. I love dumb things about it: the hot-water heater, the plastic rack you drain dishes in, the roof over my head, which occasionally leaks. And yet it is precisely those dumb things that make it what it is — a place of certainty, stability, predictability, privacy, for me and for my family. It is where I live. What more can you say about a place than that? That is everything.

Yet it is something that we have been edging away from gradually during my lifetime and the lifetimes of my parents and grandparents. There was a time when where you lived often was where you worked and where you grew the food you ate and even where you were buried. When that era passed, where you lived at least was where your parents had lived and where you would live with your children when you became enfeebled. Then, suddenly where you lived was where you lived for three years, until you could move on to something else and something else again.

And so we have come to something else again, to children who do not understand what it means to go to their rooms because they have never had a room, to men and women whose fantasy is a wall they can paint a color of their own choosing, to old people reduced to sitting on molded plastic chairs, their skin blue-white in the lights of a bus station, who pull pictures of houses out of their bags. Homes have stopped being homes. Now they are real estate.

People find it curious that those without homes would rather sleep sitting up on benches or huddled in doorways than go to shelters. Certainly some prefer to do so because they are emotionally ill, because they have been locked in before and they are damned if they will be locked in again. Others are afraid of the violence and trouble they may find there. But some seem to want something that is not available in shelters, and they will not compromise, not for a cot, or oatmeal, or a shower with special soap that kills the bugs. “One room,” a woman with a baby who was sleeping on her sister’s floor, once told me, “painted blue.” That was the crux of it; not size or location, but pride of ownership. Painted blue.

This is a difficult problem, and some wise and compassionate people are working hard at it. But in the main I think we work around it, just as we walk around it when it is lying on the sidewalk or sitting in the bus terminal — the problem, that is. It has been customary to take people’s pain and lessen our own participation in it by turning it into an issue, not a collection of human beings. We turn an adjective into a noun: the poor, not poor people; the homeless, not Ann or the man who lives in the box or the woman who sleeps on the subway grate.

Sometimes I think we would be better off if we forgot about the broad strokes and concentrated on the details. Here is a woman without a bureau. There is a man with no mirror, no wall to hang it on. They are not the homeless. They are people who have no homes. No drawer that holds the spoons. No window to look out upon the world. My God. That is everything.

These are the 5 Question

 

What is Quindlen’s Thesis?

What distinction is Quindlen making in her CONCLUSION with the sentences “They are not the homeless. They are people who have no homes”?

Why does Quindlen believe that having a home is essential?

Quindlen uses examples to support an ARGUMENT. What position does she want readers to recognize and accept?

Do you agree or disagree with Quindlen’s position? Why or why not?

Extra credit 1- geo g180

Instructions:

Write a 550-600 word (about 2 pages), double-spaced paper reviewing a news article from a current event and how it relates to a concept discussed in class.

Content:

  1. Briefly introduce the event
  2. Explicitly identify the geographic concept the event pertains to.
  3. Define and discuss the geographic concept, using your textbook.  Put it into your own words as well.
  4. Connect more information about the concept back into the event.
  5. Briefly tell me why you chose this event.

Sources:

You may use multiple sources.  The main news article should be of substantial length (it should take you at least 5 minutes to read it). You must use a reputable news source such as one of the following:

  • The Economist
  • BBC
  • NPR
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • New York Times
  • The Washington Post

You must cite all of your sources, including the news article, and your textbook.  DO NOT use wikipedia.

Formatting:

  • Paper should be no less than 550-600 words (about 2 full pages of content). Use MLA formatting for the purpose of consistency. 
  • You must include a works-cited page.
  • Include parenthetical documentation.

Submissions:

  • Copy and paste your paper into the textbox provided for this assignment online
  • You may complete up to TWO extra credit papers (submit under Extra Credit 1 and Extra Credit 2). 
  • Submit both papers in the same textbox, indicating each with different titles.
  • These must be submitted on Canvas under “Extra Credit” by the end of the day (11:59pm) of the final exam.
  • I will not accept hard/paper copies.
  • Each paper counts as a percentage point added to your final grade.  For example, if you have a 78% in the class, and complete two extra-credit papers, your final grade will be an 80%

Extra credit 2 – geo g180

Instructions:

Write a 550-600 word (about 2 pages), double-spaced paper reviewing a news article from a current event and how it relates to a concept discussed in class.

Content:

  1. Briefly introduce the event
  2. Explicitly identify the geographic concept the event pertains to.
  3. Define and discuss the geographic concept, using your textbook.  Put it into your own words as well.
  4. Connect more information about the concept back into the event.
  5. Briefly tell me why you chose this event.

Sources:

You may use multiple sources.  The main news article should be of substantial length (it should take you at least 5 minutes to read it). You must use a reputable news source such as one of the following:

  • The Economist
  • BBC
  • NPR
  • The Wall Street Journal
  • New York Times
  • The Washington Post

You must cite all of your sources, including the news article, and your textbook.  DO NOT use wikipedia.

Formatting:

  • Paper should be no less than 550-600 words (about 2 full pages of content). Use MLA formatting for the purpose of consistency. 
  • You must include a works-cited page.
  • Include parenthetical documentation.

Submissions:

  • Copy and paste your paper into the textbox provided for this assignment online
  • You may complete up to TWO extra credit papers (submit under Extra Credit 1 and Extra Credit 2). 
  • Submit both papers in the same textbox, indicating each with different titles.
  • These must be submitted on Canvas under “Extra Credit” by the end of the day (11:59pm) of the final exam.
  • I will not accept hard/paper copies.
  • Each paper counts as a percentage point added to your final grade.  For example, if you have a 78% in the class, and complete two extra-credit papers, your final grade will be an 80%

You may not participate in extra credit if:

  • You commit academic dishonesty in this class